Villain Names

Achan

ACHAN: Aramaic biblical name of a man who stole forbidden items during the assault on Jericho, for which he was stoned to death, meaning snake After his crime, he was called Achar, meaning one who troubles

Achar

Biblical name given to Achan after his crime of stealing forbidden items during the assault on Jericho, for which he was stoned to death, meaning one who troubles

Aeglaeca

Variant of Anglo-Saxon Aglaeca, meaning both demon, monster, fiend, and hero, warrior

Aeron

AERON: Welsh unisex form of feminine Celtic Agrona, name a goddess of war and death who was portrayed as a masculine figure in Welsh mythology, meaning carnage, slaughter

Aerona

AeronA: Feminine form of Welsh unisex Aeron, meaning carnage, slaughter

Aeronwen

Welsh compound name consisting of Aeron carnage, slaughter, and gwen white

Aeronwy

River of carnage/slaughter Welsh compound name consisting of the name Aeron carnage, slaughter and the word wy river

Aglaeca

Name of a character from Beowulf, meaning both demon, monster, fiend, and hero, warrior An Old English dictionary defines áglǽca as follows: wretch, miscreant, monster, demon, fierce enemy, fierce combatant, miserable being

Agro

From a Celtic word meaning battle; slaughter

Agrona

Celtic myth name of a goddess of strife and war. The name derives from Proto-Celtic Agronā, literally meaning carnage, slaughter

Alecto

Latin form of Greek Alekto, myth name of one of the Furies (Gr. Erinyes, Eumenides), meaning unceasing Virgil named two others: Megaera grudging, and Tisiphone avenging murder

Appius

Praenomen of several Romans, including Appius Claudius Sabinus Inregillensis, the founder of the clan of Claudia. He was born Attius Clausus, and became consul of Rome in 495 BCE. According to Livy, in his History of Rome, Appius was harsh by nature, having an innate love of tyranny The clan name Appius/Attius may be related to the name of the eunuch god Attis, meaning Papa

Aristodemos

"Excellence of the people." Greek name of a ruthless tyrant who ruled Elis for six months, exterminating all opposition and stealing their properties. He was finally assassinated; the Eleans erected a statue at Olympia to Kylon, the man who killed him. The name derives from the Greek elements aristos "excellence" and demos "the people."

Artemis

Greek myth name of a daughter of Zeus and Leto and twin sister to Apollo. The name is of uncertain origin. It may be related to the word artamos "a butcher" or artemes "safe."

Artemisia

Feminine form of Greek Artemisios, a name derived from the name Artemis, meaning either "safe" or "butcher."

Artemisios

Greek name derived from the name of the Greek goddess Artemis, meaning either "safe" or "butcher."

Artyom

Russian form of Greek Artemisios, a name derived from the name of the goddess Artemis, meaning either "butcher" or "safe."

Busiris

Egyptian name of a king who killed visitors to his city, meaning temple of Osiris

Damia

Feminine form of English Damian, meaning to tame, to subdue and euphemistically to kill

Damian

Spanish form of English Damian, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Damian

Spanish form of English Damian, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Damiana

Feminine form of English Damian, meaning to tame, to subdue and euphemistically to kill

Damianos

Greek named derived from the element daman, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill." Related to Damon.

Damianus

Latin form of Greek Damianos, meaning to tame, to subdue and euphemistically to kill

DamiÃno

Portuguese form of Greek Damianos, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

DamiÃno

Portuguese form of Greek Damianos, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Damien

French form of English Damian, meaning to tame, to subdue and euphemistically to kill

Damijan

Slovene form of English Damian, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Damijana

Feminine form of Slovene Damijan, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Damion

English variant of English Damian, meaning to tame, to subdue and euphemistically to kill

Damjan

Slovene form of English Damian, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Damon

Greek myth name of a friend of Pythias, derived from the element daman, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Damyan

Bulgarian form of English Damian, meaning to tame, to subdue and euphemistically to kill

Demyan

Russian form of Greek Damian, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Demyan

Russian form of Greek Damian, meaning "to tame, to subdue" and euphemistically "to kill."

Dismas

Sunset Name not actually found in the bible but given by Christians to the thief who was crucified beside Jesus.

Fachtna

Irish/Gaelic legend name of the father of Conchobhar, possibly meaning hostile, malicious

Githinji

African Embu name meaning butchers

Gituku

African Kikuyu name meaning notoriously shady and sly

Laelianus

Roman name, derived from the Roman family name, Laelius, possibly meaning lunar The name is listed among the Thirty Tyrants in the Historia Augusta. He may have been a member of the noble Spanish family called the Ulpii.

Lamia

Greek myth name of an evil spirit who abducts and murders children. The name means "vampire" in Latin and "fiend" in Arabic.

Laverna

Roman myth name of the goddess of illegally-obtained money, the patroness of charlatans, con men and thieves. Her name may mean spring-like; to be verdant

Maleagant

Originally a Knight of the Round Table, he later becomes a villain when he abducts Guinevere. She is rescued by Lancelot and Gawain. Maleagant is the son of King Bagdemagus of Gorre.

Medea

Cunning Latin form of Greek Medeia, myth name of the sorceress who helped Jason steal the Golden Fleece from his father. When Jason later abandoned her for another woman, she got revenge by killing two of her own children fathered by him.

Medeia

Original Greek form of Latin Medea, meaning "cunning."

Media

Modern variant of Latin Medea, meaning cunning

Megaera

Latin form of Greek Megaira, myth name of one of the Furies (Erinyes), meaning to grudge Virgil named two others: Alecto unceasing and Tisiphone avenging murder

Megedagik

Native American Algonquin name meaning kills many

Mercury

Myth name of a Roman god who was originally the god of tradesmen and thieves. The first planet of the solar system was named after him. The name is related to the Latin word merx from which we get the words mercantile, merchant, mercenary, and even mercy

Mordred

Otaktay

Native American Sioux name meaning kills many

PANDORA

Paris

Greek myth name of the son of Priam who kidnapped Helen and later fatally wounded Achilles. Because it had been prophesied that he would cause the collapse of Troy, his father gave him to a shepherd to be destroyed. The shepherd could not bring himself to kill the baby so he left it in the desert. Five days later He found the infant still alive and decided to "take a chance," and raise the child himself. He called the baby Paris, which was probably derived from pari "wager."

Parris

English variant of Greek Paris, probably meaning wager

Persephone

"Person-slayer." Greek myth name of a daughter of Zeus and Demeter, probably composed of the elements perso "person; human being" and phonos "murderer, slayer."

Quella

English name derived from the Old English word cweald, meaning kill

Tisiphone

"Avenging murder." Greek myth name of one of the Erinyes, composed of the elements tisis "vengeance" and phone "murder." Virgil named two others: Megaera "grudging," and Alecto "unceasing."
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