Gypsy/Romani Girl Names

Aishe

Probably a variant of Arabic Aisha, meaning alive

Dika

Possibly a variant of Duci, a pet form of Hungarian Magdolna, meaning of Magdala

Donka

Feminine pet form of Bulgarian Andon, possibly meaning invaluable

Drina

Nickname for Italian/Spanish Adriana, meaning "from Hadria."

Esmeralda

Female Spanish name, meaning "emerald." Victor Hugo gave his gypsy heroine this name in his novel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Fifika

Possibly equivalent to French Fifi, a pet form of French Jos├ęphine, meaning (God) shall add, which is usually taken to mean God will add another son

Florica

A variant of Romanian Floarea, a flower name.

Jaelle

Possibly a Romani variant of biblical Jael, the name of a Kenite woman who killed Sisera, a Canaanite general and enemy of the Israelites, meaning wild she-goat

Jofranka

Romani form of English Frances, meaning free

Kizzy

A pet form of Hebrew biblical Kezia, meaning cinnamon tree

Lala

Bulgarian name meaning tulip

Luludja

Possibly a form of Albanian Luljeta, meaning flower of life, from lule flower and jete live

Luminitsa

Romani variant of Romanian Luminita, meaning "little light," from the element lumina "light" and a diminutive suffix.

Lyuba

Pet form of Russian Lyubov, meaning "love."

Lyubitshka

Romani variant of Lyuba, meaning love

Mala

Hindi jewelry name meaning necklace

Mirela

Romanian form of French Mireille, meaning "to admire."

Nadya

Pet form of Russian Nadezhda, meaning "hope."

Shofranka

Variant of Jofranka, meaning free

Simza

Probably a Romani feminine variant of Hebrew unisex Simcha, meaning joy

Stanka

Pet form of Slavic Stanislava, meaning "glorious government."

Talaitha

Probably a variant of Aramaic Talitha, meaning little girl

Tshilaba

Possibly a variant of Arabic Taliba, meaning seeker of knowledge

Tsura

Romani variant of Slavic Zora, meaning light of dawn

Tsuritsa

Pet form of Romani Tsura, meaning light of dawn

Vadoma

Possibly a Romani feminine form of Russian Vadim, a name which some etymologists believe must have its root in Slavic vadit, vedet, or wiedziec, meaning to know, because pagan magicians were called veduny, the knowing ones

Violca

Probably a Romani form of Viola, meaning violet

Viollca

Variant of Romani Violca, meaning violet
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